Article

How to Submit a Dive Report

Tuesday, Mar 01, 2016

Dive operators often witness crimes against the environment. However, many crimes go unreported because witnesses don’t know how to report the crimes, or are in fear of repercussions against them should they report the crimes. The Sea Shepherd Dive network has been set-up to enable individuals and dive operators to report issues that they may have seen while enjoying the oceans - either away from home on holiday or in their local area.

Officials in Hong Kong confront a poaching vessel. Photo Gary Stokes/Sea Shepherd.

Since 1977 Sea Shepherd has been enforcing conservation laws on the high seas when countries and their governments have failed to do so. The high seas are a largely seen as a lawless place where crimes are committed out of sight and out of mind. Poor enforcement continues due both to a lack of resources and lack of political will.

Closer to land, enforcement varies from country to country. Sea Shepherd works with law enforcement agencies around the globe, collaborating on many conservation projects such as Operation Albacore in Gabon and Operation Sola Stella in Liberia to combat illegal fishing in West Africa. We have also worked with the government agencies of Brazil, Galapagos, Cabo Verde, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Germany, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Honduras, Italy, Nicaragua and Senegal, and the international policing organization, Interpol, to combat toothfish poaching in the Southern Ocean.

Unfortunately, environmental crimes continue to be a threat to our oceans. Profits gained from poaching and illegal fishing are high, and the chances of getting caught are low. We need to expand our reach and have eyes on every beach, headland and vessel that we can. This is where you can help.

THE REPORT NETWORK

The Sea Shepherd Dive network has been set-up to enable individuals and dive operators to report issues that they may have seen while enjoying the oceans - either away from home on holiday or in their local area. Dive operators often witness crimes against the environment. However, many crimes go unreported because witnesses don’t know how to report the crimes, or are in fear of repercussions against them should they report the crimes.

Through the Sea Shepherd Dive website, divers and dive operators can report environmental crimes that they witness while diving, anywhere around the world. Acting on behalf of the person who has reported the crime, Sea Shepherd will then contact local, regional or national authorities to notify them of the suspected criminal activity.

Sea Shepherd is renowned for drawing attention to illegal activities that threaten our oceans. We also have a proven track record of working with authorities to combat crimes against the marine environment. Thanks to the Sea Shepherd Dive initiative, we now have a platform that enables crimes to be reported, and a better chance of an active response from authorities.

Who Can Submit?

Anyone who believes that they have witnessed a crime against marine wildlife or the marine environment anywhere around the world can submit a report to Sea Shepherd Dive. Divers and dive operators often spend a lot of time in and around the ocean and, as such, form a large percentage of those who witness these crimes. Unfortunately, they can also be the perpetrators. It’s up to responsible divers to ensure that diving community is doing its part to protect the precious marine environment that well all enjoy so much.

How Does It Work?

Once a suspected crime is reported to Sea Shepherd Dive, we will forward the details of the report to our nearest country coordinator, who will report the suspected incursion to the relevant authorities, and follow-up on progress. Of course there are no guarantees as we have no control or say over any government law enforcement agency. However, we will endeavor to apply the appropriate pressure where needed. Fill out, scan, and email us the Report Form, attaching any photos or video evidence you may have, to report@seashepherdglobal.org

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT FORM (PDF)

Sea Shepherd volunteers on Operation Albacore find marine wildlife trapped in illegal nets. Photo Nelli Huié/Sea Shepherd.
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